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Making Up For Millions

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While a growing number of influencers are dictating what brands sell, beauty entrepreneur Jackie Aina is of the view they have the duty to use their platforms responsibly.

Mixing up the inspirational with informative, the thought-provoking with tongue-in-cheek, and sarcasm with calling out brands for not being inclusive, Jackie Aina is influencing the beauty industry one product at a time.

With over three million YouTube followers and 1.2 million on Instagram, Aina is one of the stand-out digital influencers cashing in on online followings to broadcast messages to millennials, lifestyle brands and billion-dollar cosmetic conglomerates.

Although Aina does all of this with a dose of humor, the journey to YouTube stardom started some 10 years ago for the 31-year-old beauty entrepreneur, when she was desperately searching for a way to escape loneliness and unfulfillment.

READ MORE | Her Brush With Business

“I had gone on to marry the guy who inspired me to join the military. We were stationed in Hawaii and we were very unhappily married. I didn’t have a job and YouTube was buzzing in 2009. We had a lot of Asian faces who were really the faces of beauty on YouTube and I didn’t really see anyone like me. So, my best friend, literally every day, said ‘why don’t you put your makeup looks on YouTube’ and I always said no.”

Her friend’s unrelenting pursuit finally paid off.

“So, one day, I decided I wasn’t doing anything, and being bored and not being fulfilled emotionally and I didn’t have a lot of positive things going on for me at the time, so that left me a lot of time to consume content and then I started creating it.

“I truly tapped into something that I needed at the time mentally and that was great. People didn’t know me but they would just gas me up; they were so nice and would always give me positive encouragement which I really needed at the time,” Aina says.

That was a lifetime ago. These days, the Los Angeles-born influencer, who was called ‘beauty influencer of the year’ by Women’s Wear Daily last year, is short-listed among the top beauty influencers in the United States, with lucrative brand collaborations behind her.

Most notably is her collaboration with the Estée Lauder-owned brand, Too Faced, as part of the Born This Way foundation range, which she helped to create.

Celebrities and influencers are increasingly being paid several thousands of dollars per tweet or Instagram post to promote products, services and even social causes.

With most millennials avoiding posts that look like sponsored ads, brands are now increasingly interested in ads that appear organic. And that is where influencers come in.

Remuneration for such posts is usually decided after considering factors like number of followers, popularity, engagement, frequency of posts, as well as the format of the post.

Furthermore, influencer accounts with massive follower counts can leverage their social media clout to showcase brands to their followers and perhaps, most importantly, use their brand voice to fight against injustice in the industry, something Aina is passionate about.

“A lot of years on YouTube were spent seeing comments from people who say things. It is easy to sit and complain but what are you doing to change the industry?”

In response, Aina decided to use her platform to fight for the change she wanted to see in the industry. She holds other influencers accountable for offensive remarks and joins controversial and tough discussions about issues like colorism in the beauty industry. And brands are starting to listen.

It was her outspoken voice in the beauty space that caught the attention of the beauty conglomerate, Too Faced, which short-listed Aina to help expand its foundation range and ensure the makeup undertones would also compliment women of color.

READ MORE | At 21, Kylie Jenner Becomes The Youngest Self-Made Billionaire Ever

“That was a testament to brands actually listening. Just because you think someone is not watching, doesn’t mean they are not watching. They are definitely watching. Sometimes all you really need is that one opportunity and that can be leveraged over and over again,” Aina says.

As brands increasingly turn away from traditional marketing, towards social influencers, young, connected digital natives like Aina, will continue to play an important role in the success of beauty brands for the foreseeable trend-obsessed digital future.

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Get Set Mo!

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Morongoa Mahope feeds her love for extreme biking with petrol and adrenaline. The funds for her pet passion come from her nine-to-five accounting job.

About 10kms north of the Kyalami Grand Prix Circuit in South Africa is another racetrack, where superbikes and sports cars are noisily revving up their engines, getting ready for a practice run on a cold Wednesday afternoon in Johannesburg.

At first glance at the Zwartkops racetrack is a melange of male drivers and mechanics.

But also revving up a superbike, the one numbered 83, is Morongoa Mahope from Mahwelereng in the Limpopo province of South Africa.

READ MORE: ‘From Zero to Hero’: The Queen Of The 800 meters Caster Semenya

She is about to clock 270kmph on her black bike, tagged #Mo83 in pink.

When she is not burning rubber on the racetrack, Mahope is an accountant working for an advertising agency in the city.

“When I started [superbiking], it was mainly only for leisure because I love the sound bikes and cars make. I’m a petrol head and just wanted it to commute to work,” she says.

Morongoa Mahope

Her journey started in 2013 when she convinced her husband and family about buying a superbike. Her family was initially apprehensive and viewed superbike racing as dangerous.

Her husband finally relented and Mahope went for a day’s training to see if she really would be interested in the bike before investing in it. The 36-year-old sports fanatic succumbed, and indeed pursued her wish.

“I still have my first bike; it’s a green and black Kawasaki Ninja 250cc. I was just using it to [go to] work until I met a biking club, the Eagle Bikers Club Limpopo,” she recalls.

Mahope was riding with the club, doing breakfast runs between Johannesburg and Limpopo; but, in 2015, they took a trip to Nelspruit in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa.

READ MORE: Making Up For Millions

Navigating the mountainous, curvy roads, Mahope was overtaking men with her small 250cc bike at the bends.

She was then goaded by her fellow riders to try the racing circuit.

“I went to the track and met a superbike racer; Themba Khumalo, and I started following his journey. I spent more time on the track, practising so I could start racing in 2016. The love for the sport was getting deeper and deeper,” says Mahope.

Khumalo, a professional superbike rider who has raced in the European Championships, says he met Mahope at Zwartkops and it was her first time at the track, and she was quite fast at the corners.

He went up to her to introduce himself because it was rare to see a black woman on a racetrack.

READ MORE: Higher Revenues And Greater Optimism: Female-Owned Small Businesses Are Gaining Ground

“I then took her through the fundamentals of racing and the basics; the type of bike she would need and the equipment. I could see how committed she was and how quick she was learning, and her lack of fear. She was going farther than where she was,” says Khumalo.  

However, her male counterparts were not impressed with her pace on the track; they remarked negatively about her. But Mahope didn’t let the minimizing comments derail her mission.

Unfortunately, Mahope was involved in an accident during training on Valentine’s Day in 2017 and fractured her clavicle before her first race. That took her off the bike for six months.

She joked about the incident with friends, but they persisted and told her it’s an unsafe sport. That encouraged her even more; she wore her helmet and gloves, clocking higher speeds than ever before on her superbike.

Indeed, it was a learning curve. A few months later, she was invited to Bulawayo in Zimbabwe to race.

READ MORE: Shopping for ideas

Her first official race was the same year as the injury; it was a club race in Delmas, Mpumalanga, at the Red Star Raceway. She had never been on the grid nor practised how to stud, but for her, it was more about the experience despite the shivers and nerves.

“I finished the race and I was second last. It’s part of how you start but you will improve to be better. And now, I have lost count of the races I have competed in,” she says.

Mahope is racing in the short circuit series for women who use the 250cc, being the only black woman to participate. She also participated in the Extreme Festival tour series, a regional race in which she used her Kawasaki Ninja ZX600cc, racing men with bigger and louder bikes.

“I am the first black woman to be in the grand prix and the challenges that I faced were having to teach myself a lot of things. I had to learn how to ride on the track, the speed, the decelerating, all was new to me. I wasn’t helped.”

Mahope started at a late stage with the sport, and had to put in more time and effort in a short period to get to where she is currently.

READ MORE: Linda Ikeji : Nigeria’s Queen of content raking in millions

Today, she assists women who are starting with the sport.  

Sadly, in South Africa, there is no national league for women to race and represent the country despite finishing in the top three in the 2019 races.

With all her achievements thus far, Mahope’s salary sustains her motorsport passion.

“Racing is very expensive; the more you practise, the more you get better and the more you spend money. On practice day, I spend about R3,000 ($206) and would practise twice a week at different tracks. In total, I would spend R18,000 ($1,235) a month for the track excluding the travel costs to the track and race day,” she explains.These costs cover tyres, fuel and entrance to the tracks.

A sum of about R40,000 ($2,744) can get you geared up for the bike and track.

It just shows this daredevil accountant can balance both the books and the bike.

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Africa’s Most Dynamic Thought-Leaders, Industry Game-Changers And Icons Of Social Activism Set To Feature At The Exclusive FORBES WOMAN AFRICA 2020 Leading Women Summit

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Africa’s most dynamic thought-leaders, industry game-changers and icons of social activism are set to feature at the exclusive FORBES WOMAN AFRICA Leading Women Summit presented by Mastercard (#LWS2020KZN) and hosted by the KwaZulu-Natal government – taking place at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli ICC Complex in Durban on Friday, 6 March 2020.

For the 5th edition of this globally-renowned event, panellists and speakers will engage with the impactful 2020 theme, ‘The Ceiling Crashers 2.0: Power with Purpose’. The day’s thought-provoking discussions will be followed by the highly-anticipated FORBES WOMAN AFRICA Awards Gala Dinner which celebrates the continent’s most influential female ‘ceiling crashers’ across a number of key categories. 

“The FORBES WOMAN AFRICA Leading Women Summit has grown to become one of the biggest female-empowerment events, boasting a high calibre of attendees and unparalleled speaker line-up,” said Renuka Methil, Managing Editor of FORBES WOMAN AFRICA.

“This promises to be the biggest instalment yet, featuring female pioneers and path-breakers across the continent. Audiences will be exposed to dynamic discussions about the growing the number of women in leadership – something government and business really need to factor into their strategies. We will also get to grips with a new discourse that focuses on dismantling power structures and the need for truly inclusive cultures in business and society.”

This highly-anticipated event, which is hosted annually in honour of International Women’s Day, is expected to draw an audience of around 1 000 leading women. Through hard-hitting talks, fireside chats and insightful panel sessions centred on ‘ceiling crashers’, attendees will be inspired to make meaningful changes within their own industries, secure in the knowledge that they have the support of these innovative allies. This year’s programme promises an influential mix of leaders in healthcare and business; advocates of social and environmental activism; award-winning artists and internationally-renowned stateswomen.

For the first time, FORBES WOMAN AFRICA will be releasing its own list of ‘Africa’s Most Powerful Women’, many of whom will be attending the summit. The list will be published in the March issue of the magazine, outlining those who have been leading ideas and industries while purposefully contributing to nation-building and positively impacting the lives around them.

The FORBES WOMAN AFRICA Awards Gala Dinner, which is hosted the evening of the summit, is an opportunity to recognise the trailblazers and role models who have created a new narrative within their industries. By challenging authority and ‘old school’ traditions, they are enabling future generations to live in a better and more equal world.

Beatrice Cornacchia, Senior Vice President, Marketing and Communications, Mastercard Middle East and Africa, said: “African women are a vital source of innovation, prosperity, and economic growth. Yet inequality and exclusion still hold women back in many aspects of their everyday lives – from growing their businesses to having the financial tools to participate in the formal economy; from joining the C-Suite to following their passions. We are proud to partner with FORBES WOMAN AFRICA as we believe that it is only by bringing diverse perspectives to the table that we can unlock Africa’s possibilities to women.”

Managing Director of the ABN Group, Roberta Naicker, said the organisation was excited that the KwaZulu-Natal government would, once again, play host to this illustrious event, which serves to highlight the continent’s most influential female leaders while also shining a spotlight on this beautiful region. “A summit of this calibre showcases that KZN is being positioned as a world-class events’ destination. We are excited to have renowned speakers and attendees will get the opportunity to engage on hard-hitting issues during the summit, while also affording them the chance to enjoy the many recreational tourism sites and activities for which KZN is renowned.”

Tickets to the exclusive 2020 FORBES WOMAN AFRICA Leading Women Summit and Gala Dinner are available at a cost of R3499, available through Webtickets (https://www.webtickets.co.za/v2/event.aspx?itemid=1496991848). Tickets are limited and interested parties are urged to book early to avoid disappointment. There are also select opportunities to get involved with the event sponsorship, exhibiting at the on-site marketplace or by sponsoring a mentee. Please visit website for further details.

The 2020 FORBES WOMAN AFRICA Leading Women Summit is presented by Mastercard (@MastercardMEA) and hosted by KZN Provincial Government (@KZNgov). Keep updated on all the latest news and announcements on Twitter @LWSummit and join the conversation using the hashtags #LWS2020KZN #DOKZN.

Contact details:

Office: +27 (11) 384 0300

Sponsorship and exhibition opportunities: [email protected]

Media partnerships and press accreditation: [email protected]

Event-related queries: [email protected] Website:www.Leadingwomensummit.co.za

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Higher Revenues And Greater Optimism: Female-Owned Small Businesses Are Gaining Ground

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The momentum is strong for U.S. female-owned businesses. So strong, according to Sharon Miller, Bank of America’s head of small business, that “this was the first time in four years where we found that women were actually more optimistic than their male counterparts around their hiring outlook, their revenue prospects and their growth.” 

Miller’s evaluation stems from a  2019 Bank of America report that surveyed 1,323 small businesses, 524 of which were owned by women. The businesses had annual revenues ranging from $100,000 to $4,999,999 and between two and 99 employees. Its main goal was to assess the current climate for female entrepreneurs across the country. 

Eighty-four percent of the female business owners surveyed—most in the consumer products, professional practices and personal services industries—expect year-over-year revenue growth, according to the report, and 73% of them plan to expand their businesses, in contrast with only 66% of male business owners who have expansion plans.

READ MORE: Simplifying Big Money Talk

“We’ve seen more success across the board with women, and women can identify with other women,” says Miller. “When you can see someone else—their success and that they’re like you—I think it just goes well for confidence.”

Miller highlights the importance of business owners identifying with people who look like them, but the Bank of America report does not break down numbers by background or ethnicity. 

But a similar report by American Express does exactly that. It finds that the number of women-owned businesses grew 21% from 2014 to 2019, but those owned by women of color grew at double that rate (at 43%). For black women, specifically, businesses grew even faster—by a rate of 50%. It’s the first time the report took into account part-time entrepreneurs, according to American Express senior vice president Courtney Kelso.

READ MORE: Making Up For Millions

“In some cases, women of color are starting these businesses out of necessity—because they are struggling to find jobs or need to supplement their incomes—or because they want flexibility because they have caregiving responsibilities,” says Kelso. “Also, increasingly women of color may be testing a business idea while holding down a job or seeking a creative outlet or an additional challenge.”

While the two reports points to great strides for women-owned businesses, Liz Sara, National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) chair, thinks that it also speaks to “some of the major challenges that we’re trying to overcome to make it easier for women.” One major problem that persists: raising capital. In fact, according to Bank of America’s report, more than half of female entrepreneurs say they do not have equal access to capital.

To help combat this, NWBC has been working with members of Congress to implement an angel investor tax credit that would act as an incentive for individuals to support local women-owned businesses in their community.  

So far, Sara says, the proposed tax credit seems to be gaining momentum. And given the fact that female founders raised just 2.3% of the total venture capital funding in 2018, the tax credit would be one small step toward closing the venture capital gender gap.

Brianne Garrett

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